Quick Start

How to use Prometheus with DC/OS

This section will explain how to configure Prometheus for use with DC/OS.

Prerequisites

  • A running DC/OS 1.11 cluster

Install

Prometheus can be installed via either the DC/OS Catalog web interface or by using the CLI. The following command will launch the install via the DC/OS CLI:

dcos package install prometheus --yes

Prometheus Install

Figure 1. Installing Prometheus

Install Grafana from the service catalog as well. It can be used as a graphing tool.

dcos package install grafana --yes

The framework provides options to enter the Prometheus, AlertManager and Rules config. The default Prometheus configuration scrapes a DC/OS master and agents in the clusters. The framework allows users to append any new config to the end for full extensibility.

Accessing the Prometheus UI with EdgeLB (Enterprise Feature)

Once the framework is up and running:

  1. Install EdgeLB.
  2. Create a file named prometheus-edgelb.json containing the following edge-lb configuration:
{
  "apiVersion": "V2",
  "name": "prometheus",
  "count": 1,
  "haproxy": {
    "frontends": [
      {
        "bindPort": 9092,
        "protocol": "HTTP",
        "linkBackend": {
          "defaultBackend": "prometheus"
        }
      },
      {
        "bindPort": 9093,
        "protocol": "HTTP",
        "linkBackend": {
          "defaultBackend": "alertmanager"
        }
      },
      {
        "bindPort": 9094,
        "protocol": "HTTP",
        "linkBackend": {
          "defaultBackend": "grafana"
        }
      },
      {
        "bindPort": 9091,
        "protocol": "HTTP",
        "linkBackend": {
          "defaultBackend": "pushgateway"
        }
      }
    ],
    "backends": [
     {
      "name": "prometheus",
      "protocol": "HTTP",
      "services": [{
        "endpoint": {
          "type": "ADDRESS",
          "address": "prometheus.prometheus.l4lb.thisdcos.directory",
          "port": 9090
        }
      }]
    },
    {
     "name": "alertmanager",
     "protocol": "HTTP",
     "services": [{
       "endpoint": {
         "type": "ADDRESS",
         "address": "alertmanager.prometheus.l4lb.thisdcos.directory",
         "port": 9093
       }
     }]
   },
   {
    "name": "grafana",
    "protocol": "HTTP",
    "services": [{
      "endpoint": {
        "type": "ADDRESS",
        "address": "grafana.grafana.l4lb.thisdcos.directory",
        "port": 3000
      }
    }]
   },
   {
    "name": "pushgateway",
    "protocol": "HTTP",
    "services": [{
      "endpoint": {
        "type": "ADDRESS",
        "address": "pushgateway.prometheus.l4lb.thisdcos.directory",
        "port": 9091
      }
    }]
   }
   ]
  }
}

Description of the EdgeLB configuration above:

  • Exposes Prometheus Pushgateway UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9091
  • Exposes Prometheus UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9092
  • Exposes Prometheus Alertmanager UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9093
  • Exposes Grafana UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9094
  1. Deploy the edge-lb service configuration above using:
dcos edgelb create prometheus-edgelb.json

Accessing the Prometheus UI using MarathonLB (OSS)

  1. Install Marathon-LB
dcos package install marathon-lb --yes
  1. Create a file named prometheus-marathonlb.json containing the following marathon-lb proxy configuration:
{
  "id": "/prometheus-proxy",
  "instances": 1,
  "cpus": 0.001,
  "mem": 16,
  "cmd": "tail -F /dev/null",
  "container": {
    "type": "MESOS"
  },
  "portDefinitions": [
    {
      "protocol": "tcp",
      "port": 0
    },
    {
      "protocol": "tcp",
      "port": 0
    },
    {
      "protocol": "tcp",
      "port": 0
     },
  {
      "protocol": "tcp",
      "port": 0
     }
  ],
  "labels": {
    "HAPROXY_GROUP": "external",
    "HAPROXY_0_MODE": "http",
    "HAPROXY_0_PORT": "9092",
    "HAPROXY_0_BACKEND_SERVER_OPTIONS": "server prometheus prometheus.prometheus.l4lb.thisdcos.directory:9090",
    "HAPROXY_1_MODE": "http",
    "HAPROXY_1_PORT": "9093",
    "HAPROXY_1_BACKEND_SERVER_OPTIONS": "server alertmanager alertmanager.prometheus.l4lb.thisdcos.directory:9093",
    "HAPROXY_2_MODE": "http",
    "HAPROXY_2_PORT": "9091",
    "HAPROXY_2_BACKEND_SERVER_OPTIONS": "server pushgateway pushgateway.prometheus.l4lb.thisdcos.directory:9091",
    "HAPROXY_3_MODE": "http",
    "HAPROXY_3_PORT": "9094",
    "HAPROXY_3_BACKEND_SERVER_OPTIONS": "server grafana grafana.grafana.l4lb.thisdcos.directory:3000"
  }
}

Description of the Marathon-LB configuration above:

  • Exposes Prometheus Pushgateway UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9091
  • Exposes Prometheus UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9092
  • Exposes Prometheus Alertmanager UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9093
  • Exposes Grafana UI at http://<public-agent-ip>:9094

Enter the following address in your browser:

http://<public-agent-ip>:9092

You should see the Prometheus UI: Prometheus Dashboard Figure 2. Prometheus dashboard

You can also verify that Prometheus is serving metrics about itself by navigating to its metrics endpoint:

http://<public-agent-ip>:9092/metrics

Using the Expression browser

Go back to the console view, and enter this into the expression console:

prometheus_target_interval_length_seconds

This should return a number of different time series (along with the latest value recorded for each), all with the metric name prometheus_target_interval_length_seconds.

As another example, enter the following expression to graph the per-second rate of chunks being created in the self-scraped Prometheus:

rate(prometheus_tsdb_head_chunks_created_total[1m])

Prometheus Graphing

Figure 3. Prometheus graphing

Using Grafana with Prometheus

Navigate to the following URL using the credentials admin/admin.

http://<public-agent-ip>:9094

This takes you to the Grafana console.

Grafana Logging

Figure 4. Grafana console.

You can add Prometheus as a data source:

The default installation URL is http://prometheus-0-server.prometheus.autoip.dcos.thisdcos.directory:1025

Note: your data source will not register without http:// in front of the URL

Grafana Data Source

Figure 5. Grafana data source

Save and Test. Now you are ready to use Prometheus as a data source in Grafana.

Create a Dashboard

To create a graph, select your Prometheus data source, and enter any Prometheus expression into the “Query” field, while using the “Metric” field to lookup metrics via autocompletion.

The following shows an example Prometheus graph configuration using the variable rate(prometheus_http_request_duration_seconds_count[5m])

Grafana Prom Graph

Figure 6. Grafana Prometheus graph configuration

AlertManager

The AlertManager handles alerts sent by client applications such as the Prometheus server. It takes care of deduplicating, grouping, and routing them to the correct receiver integration such as email, PagerDuty, or OpsGenie. It also takes care of silencing and inhibition of alerts.

AlertManager UI:

http://<public-agent-ip>:9093

AlertManager Dashboard

Figure 7. AlertManager dashboard

AlertManager with Webhook

The default configuration for AlertManager (these configurations can be changed) in the framework is configured with a Webhook receiver:

route:
 group_by: [cluster]
 receiver: webh
 group_interval: 1m

receivers:
- name: webh
  webhook_configs:
  - url: http://webhook.marathon.l4lb.thisdcos.directory:1234

Default rule defined in the framework:

groups:
- name: cpurule
  rules:
  - alert: highcpu
    expr: cpu_total > 2
    annotations:
      DESCRIPTION: 'it happened yeah'
      SUMMARY: 'it happened'

Next, run the following config as a Marathon app:

{
    "container": {
        "docker": {
            "image": "python:latest"
        },
        "type": "MESOS"
    },
    "mem": 1024,
    "portDefinitions": [
        {
            "labels": {
                "VIP_0": "webhook:1234"
            },
            "protocol": "tcp",
            "name": "web",
            "port": 1234
        }
    ],
    "cmd": "env | sort\n\ncat > function.py << EOF\n\nimport sys\nimport cgi\nimport json\nimport pipes\nfrom BaseHTTPServer import BaseHTTPRequestHandler, HTTPServer\n\n\nclass MyHandler(BaseHTTPRequestHandler):\n   def do_POST(self):\n       self.send_response(200)\n       self.end_headers()\n       #data = json.loads(self.rfile.read(int(self.headers['Content-Length'])))\n       data = self.rfile.read(int(self.headers['Content-Length']))\n       self.log_message('%s', data)\n\n\nhttpd = HTTPServer(('0.0.0.0', $PORT_WEB), MyHandler)\nhttpd.serve_forever()\nEOF\n\npython2 function.py\n",
    "networks": [
        {
            "mode": "host"
        }
    ],
    "cpus": 0.1,
    "id": "webhook"
}

Check the logs for this app. The AlertManager will send HTTP POST requests in the following JSON format:

{
  "receiver": "webh",
  "status": "firing",
  "alerts": [
    {
      "status": "firing",
      "labels": {
        "alertname": "highcpu",
        "cluster_id": "4c7ab85b-ce28-4bdd-8a2d-87c71d02759e",
        "hostname": "10.0.1.16",
        "instance": "10.0.1.16:61091",
        "job": "dcos-metrics",
        "mesos_id": "29bac9b2-cbdb-4093-a907-6c4904a1360a-S5"
      },
      "annotations": {
        "DESCRIPTION": "it happened yeah",
        "SUMMARY": "it happened"
      },
      "startsAt": "2018-07-12T17:32:56.030479955Z",
      "endsAt": "0001-01-01T00:00:00Z",
      "generatorURL": "http://ip-10-0-1-16.us-west-2.compute.internal:1025/graph?g0.expr=cpu_total+%3E+2&g0.tab=1"
    },
...
...
...
}

AlertManager with Slack

Slack notifications are sent via Slack webhooks. Update the AlertManager config to:

route:
 group_by: [cluster]
 # If an alert isn't caught by a route, send it slack.
 receiver: slack_general
 routes:
  # Send severity=slack alerts to slack.
  - match:
      severity: slack
    receiver: slack_general

receivers:
- name: slack_general
  slack_configs:
  - api_url: <Slack webhook URL>
    channel: '#alerts_test'

Slack Alerts

Figure 8. Slack alerts

PushGateway

The Prometheus PushGateway exists to allow ephemeral and batch jobs to expose their metrics to Prometheus.

Pushing some metrics: Push a single sample into the group identified by {job=“some_job”}:

echo "some_metric 3.14" | curl --data-binary @- http://pushgateway.example.org:9091/metrics/job/some_job

PushGateway

Figure 9. PushGateway